Why Go With Used Trucks

As many of us know, a car is an important but highly expensive purchase. When you add up the cost of the car, its insurance and its fuel, the final sum is quite impressive. This is why many people decide to buy used cars. The benefits in this situation often outweighs the potential disadvantages. Owning a truck can make a lot of things in life easier. It enables you to handle larger loads. Much like other used cars, used trucks can be highly reliable.

The most obvious benefit is the lower cost, but even this feature goes further than you might expect. Used trucks depreciate less, allowing you to get more money if you ever decide to sell it in the future. It has thoroughly been tested by the previous owner, so you know that it has some reliability to offer. You don’t have to go through the break in period, and used trucks are less likely to develop new mechanical or electrical problems. In the long run, this saves even more money on repairs. You can even go through a certification program to be sure that the truck you are buying has been tested for quality, and all those with problems have been weeded out. Many used vehicles also come with a manufacturer’s warranty. This is something else that is available through a certification program, and it protects you in case something goes wrong with the truck further down the line.

Trucks are known for being some of the most sturdy, reliable types of vehicles out there. This is no less true for used trucks. Buying used is an excellent way to save money and still be sure that you are getting a quality car. There are many advantages that any customer is sure to appreciate. Now you can get out on the road feeling good about your choices with the transportation and hauling power you need.

How to Save With Dealer-approved Car Loans

People want to save money on products they buy, and this is most true of products that cost more. Cars are one key example. People certainly are inclined to make any effort to save money on car loans when the overall price can represent such a large sum. Car dealers have access and industry insight that can save people money in the long run. Working with one can potentially save anyone looking for a car a reasonable amount of money.

Preferred Lenders

Dealerships often negotiate car loans through a bank. Because these companies have so much business, they often qualify for special rates at a number of financial institutions. This can be advantageous for many customers looking for a good deal. The connections a dealer has can lead to a better price for consumers. It is important to check with a dealership to find out what sort of options it can provide.

Less Down

People looking for car loans through a dealership could also qualify for less down on competitive rates. It could benefit a person looking for such loan to pay less in the beginning and enjoy good rates such as those that a dealership can provide. Even if the dealership cannot guarantee better rates for less down, it still can offer competitive rates for a potentially smaller amount of money. Working with a dealership can be important for anyone who wants more personalization with his or her car loan.

More Options

Another opportunity a dealership can provide is more options. Dealerships have been selling cars for years, and they can leverage their industry knowledge to create a better end result. A person in such a situation should consider reaching out to the professional service with particular requests.

Anyone looking for car loans should explore his or her options and see how a dealership might be an essential part of owning a new car.

Car Loans Help Dealerships Form Solid Relationships With Customers

It’s not impossible to purchase a shiny brand new car with a poor credit history. In fact, it’s relatively easy if you turn to your local dealership. Dealerships like us are often willing to bend over backwards to help people get the wheels they desperately need. Why is that, you may ask? Well, it has to do with an important and treasured concept in business called customer relationships. When we help people get bad credit car loans on good terms, we forge very strong relationships with our customers, and these customers often come back to us again and again for their future automotive needs.

We enjoy making people happy and watching the cars they purchase from us enact a positive change in their lives. If you’ve been without your own vehicle for a significant period of time, you may have no idea how much simpler it will make your life. The pace of public transportation in most cities just can’t compare with being behind the wheel of your very own car. Bad credit car loans will help you get to the point where it’s no longer a struggle for you to pay the bills. Just imagine how nice it will be if you can cut your commute time down by half!

When we are able to help people like you make their lives so much easier, we know that we’ve formed a strong business relationship that will last for years into the future. Perhaps you will buy your next car from us ten or twenty years down the road. We often don’t make any money off the loans themselves, but the value of the relationships we have with our customers more than makes up for that. We hope you will turn to us for bad credit car loans and let your new wheels turn your life around in a more positive direction.

‘Don’t shop for the cheapest car’: tips on the smart way to buy used

Taking the vehicle for an independent inspection is recommended, says Car Help Canada consultant.

Sales of new vehicles may have hit a record high, surpassing the two-million mark for the first time last year, but the majority of consumers are still projected to buy used primarily for one key reason: cost savings.

DesRosiers Automotive Consultants forecasts that about 59 per cent of prospective buyers in Canada will purchase used vehicles this year.

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It’s been well established that new vehicles incur rapid depreciation as soon as they’re driven off the lot. Most new cars can lose up to 50 per cent of their value during the first four years of ownership.

That’s exactly why Esther Paulsen and her husband Tim bought second-hand when they were shopping around for a replacement vehicle last December for their growing family.

“Our decision to go new or used was dictated by budget,” said Paulsen, a teacher in Toronto. “We didn’t even look at new as I was coming off a maternity leave and we are basically single salary with two kids.”

But looking to save money buying second-hand shouldn’t preclude buyers from wanting to ensure their car is in top condition, cautions George Iny, president of the Automobile Protection Association.

‘More value for your dollar’

“Generally speaking, a three- or four-year-old used car coming off lease would offer more value for your dollar,” he said. “But I wouldn’t be a price junkie. Don’t shop for the cheapest car. That’s what most consumer advice tells you to do. It’s a mistake.”

Iny points to previous research conducted by the APA in the Greater Toronto market at a time when the popular Honda Fit was relatively new and in short supply. His organization found 25 used Fits for sale on auto classifieds site AutoTrader.ca.

“We then looked at the cheapest seven of them and there was a story with every single ad: curb-sider, accident reconstruction, sketchy maintenance, collisions. So you’d be better off looking for used vehicles that are higher priced and bringing an ad for one of the low-priced models that’s similar to negotiate with the seller.”

Finding a car in excellent condition will mean having it checked out, Iny added. “You have to see service records.”

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But if a seller can’t show you a car’s full history, copying down its vehicle identification number (VIN) to get a CarProof report can help identify previous accident claims and any outstanding liens, said Mohamed Bouchama, a consultant for Car Help Canada.

“You have to be very careful. You don’t want to buy somebody else’s problem,” he said, adding to make sure that if the vehicle has been subject to recall or repairs to check that the repairs have in fact been done.

Iny noted that CarProof reports aren’t infallible, though. “Information is often missing on collisions but the big stuff should show up in Ontario, and in B.C. it’s very reliable — 90-plus per cent reliable. In Quebec it’s unreliable,” he said.

Taking the vehicle for an independent inspection, especially if the vehicle is outside the warranty coverage, is also recommended, Bouchama said, “despite the fact that 50 per cent of buyers don’t do that.”

Buyers should also be extra cautious about any hidden issues if they’re purchasing a used vehicle from a private seller versus a dealership.

“If you buy from a dealer, you’re fully protected. If you had a problem and the dealer didn’t disclose it, then you have every right to go back to the dealership and there are laws that protect you from a dealer. When you buy privately you’re not protected at all,” Bouchama said.

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Other common burns prospective buyers should watch out for include sellers who mess with the mileage. “Believe it or not, these day it’s a lot easier to roll back the odometer,” said Bouchama.

Its something that can be determined by taking the VIN to a dealership and having them input it into their database to determine the last time the vehicle was serviced and what the mileage was, he added.

Even asking to see if a used car has snow tires can tell you a lot about its history, Iny added.

“That gives you an idea that the person wasn’t pinching pennies on their vehicle.”

How to negotiate when buying a car

Anyone can and should haggle when buying a vehicle. In fact, 64% of those who tried to negotiate when buying a car were successful, with just 16% of those failing to bag a discount, according to Money Advice Service research. So read our tips for negotiating car prices.

  • How to haggle for a new car
  • Top tips for getting a great deal
  • How to haggle for a used car
  • Your next step

How to haggle for a new car

Make sure you’ve worked out what you can afford and have done plenty of research into the car you’re planning to buy – including the list price.

Whether you’re paying cash, part exchanging or organising a finance plan, car dealers’ prices aren’t fixed.

So arm yourself with our top tips below.

Top tips for getting a great deal

What to do in advance

  • Make sure you know the car’s list price. Look at the manufacturer’s website, or car websites such as Parkers or What Car? Or check the new car listings at the back of weekly motoring magazines such as Auto Express.
  • Know the critical features suiting your needs. Don’t get talked into a lower specification because it is cheaper – instead, aim to get the model you really want at a discount.
  • Check online for rival dealers in your area to see if any of them are offering deals on the same car. This can be a good bargaining tool.
  • If you’re part-exchanging your current car, make sure you know what it’s worth. The more you can get for it, the less hard you’ll have to haggle on the rest of your deal. You can get a free valuation quickly and easily on sites such as Parkers opens in new window or a more detailed valuation if you pay a fee.
  • Always test drive the car. Remember to try it up hills, in traffic and out on the open road. If possible, compare it with lower and higher specifications of the same car.

When talking to the salesperson

  • Be friendly and polite, but never let the salesperson know your top limit.
  • If you’re a cash buyer, don’t tell the salesperson this straight away. Dealers make bigger profits on finance deals, so let them bargain the car’s price on this basis. You can then decline the finance deal later in the process.
  • Start off by stating an amount lower than what you’re actually prepared to pay – you can then gradually increase it if necessary.
  • When you make an offer, don’t speak again until the salesperson replies.
  • Be as positive as possible about your aims. For example, don’t say “Can I have a discount?” Instead, ask “How much discount will you give me?”
  • Some negotiators start by saying they’re not prepared to pay the price advertised, but remember they ARE there to do a deal!
  • If you’re struggling to get a discount but you want the car, offer to close the deal there and then if you can both agree a price.
  • Don’t be afraid to walk out if the dealer isn’t prepared to negotiate or move much on the price.

How to haggle for a used car?

Buying a used car from a dealer is less risky than buying privately because you have more consumer rights if the car shows serious faults later.

Many of our top tips above apply when negotiating with dealers over used cars.

Buying a used car privately will usually get you a better deal than when buying through a dealer.

The seller is often in more of a hurry and so more open to haggling.

For instance, they might have seen a car they want to buy and are under pressure to sell their old car.

Or perhaps they’ve already bought another car and have to run two cars until they sell their old one.

Which ever way you buy a used car, you’ll have more bargaining points than with a new car.

For example:

  • Technical faults
  • Tyres in borderline condition
  • An incomplete service history or MOT
  • Damage to the car such as dents or chips
  • The car being due for expensive cam belt change

If possible, try to find out how long the seller has been marketing the car.

Perhaps they’ve had a sign up in the window for a while?

Or advertised it in the local paper for a week already, or had it on a site such as Auto Trader for a while?

If you haven’t already decided how you’re going to pay for your car, find out about your options as soon as possible.

If you have problems with your car, your consumer rights might be influenced by how you paid for it.

This is an important consideration.

Buying a Used Car: How to Choose a Payment Option

When the time comes to buy a used car, there are many financial factors to consider. Perhaps your budget will narrow your used car choices, or you may not be aware of the payment options available. We are ready to show you some ways you can pay for your vehicle and to show you that the make and model you desire most may well be within your reach if you plan carefully.

Consider the Time Frame

As you consider payment options, one of the first factors you might want to think about is how long you will be paying for your car. Whether you secure a loan through the bank or choose in-house financing with us and depending on your credit, your loan could be as brief as two or three years or as long as five. It is important to understand the exact terms of the length of your loan before you sign off on a vehicle.

Give Yourself Time

Even if you find yourself needing a new vehicle for your commute to work or school, you should avoid jumping into a deal right away. Take the time to consider your options, as this may help you avoid hefty payments that might be hard to handle later on. For example, ask yourself whether your current car is a valid trade in or if you can secure a down payment that may help lower the cost of a vehicle.

Review Your Budget

One mistake many people make when they shop for used cars is to miscalculate how much they can afford to pay monthly. To avoid this error, you will need to factor more than just the car payment into your auto ownership budget. The cost of insurance, gas and other taxes and fees that will need to be paid when you purchase a vehicle should all be included in your budget to ensure you do not overextend it.

Buying a used car can be a challenge, especially if you are

Car Shopping: 3 Ways to Offset Bad Credit

When you try to get a loan for a car from the dealership, one of the first things we look at is your credit score. If your score is low, however, there is still hope. There are ways to get approved for the car loan you need even if you have bad credit.

 

Qualified Co-Signer

 

A co-signer with better credit can be your saving grace. Having someone co-sign the loan can help you get the car you want while reassuring us that the loan will be paid. The co-signer agrees that, in the event that you do not make payments, he or she will take responsibility for them. You get approved, and we get assurance that the loan will be paid.

 

Trade-In

 

Another way to be approved for bad credit car loans is to trade in your old vehicle for the one you want to purchase. The value of the trade-in can lower the total loan amount, making lending to you less of a risk, even if you have bad credit. The car you no longer need can help you get the next car.

 

Large Down Payment

 

As lenders, we tend to consider bad credit a big lending risk. If, however, you can demonstrate that your credit is not indicative of poor cash flow, it is not so much of a problem. One way to do that is to offer a large down payment on the car. If you are able to put a significant portion of the car’s value down, this increases your chance of being approved for a loan. It lowers the amount you will need to borrow and proves that producing money is not an insurmountable challenge to you.

 

Even if you have bad credit, it is still possible to be approved for a car loan. Credit score is just one factor used in determining approval.

A Financial Primer on Buying a Used Car

Buying a used car is one of the bigger decisions a consumer makes in his or her lifetime, so getting it right is important. In reality, the financials of buying one of our used cars isn’t really all that complicated; nonetheless, there are several key things to keep in mind. Following these steps will help the buyer master the financial aspects of car buying.

Paying Cash

If the car buyer has enough cash on hand, it is always nice to pay for it all at once. Not having monthly car payments can free up money for other things and leave a cushion for maintenance costs. The buyer should make sure he or she has enough money left over to pay for gas, routine repairs, license fees and car insurance. Also, sometimes the buyer can negotiate a better purchase price by paying in cash.

Getting a Loan

When taking out a used car loan, there are a few rules of thumb to keep in mind. It is a good idea to put 10 percent down on the car and to try to pay off the entire loan in three to four years. The total cost of the car should not exceed 20 percent of the buyer’s monthly take home pay. These are just general guidelines and the loan should be structured to meet the budget of the buyer.

We offer a full service finance department that can guide customer’s through the steps of getting a car loan. In most cases, this can be taken care of in an hour or two. It is a great convenience for the buyer to handle everything all in one place.

Saving Money

Used cars are a great deal for the buyer. They can save the customer a large sum of money by reducing purchase price, taxes and insurance costs while providing a vehicle that will provide dependable transportation for years.

Three Perks of Purchasing a Car Maintenance Program

Coverage for prepaid maintenance plans ranges from one make to another, and can run from basic oil changes and tire rotations to full coverage for up to five years. Some programs even include free roadside assistance. If you sell your vehicle before the designated end of your maintenance program, coverage extends to the subsequent owner, which may help raise your resale value. Prepaid plans are geared towards creating positive relationships with customers, and are used as a negotiable perk on the sales floor. As such, they often offer services at a substantial discount to outside prices.

Enjoying the Amenities of a Dealership Service Department

When it comes to car repairs, many would rather pass a kidney stone than visit their local mechanic. Luckily, dealership operated service departments offer the same car maintenance services as your local garage, but with many additional perks such as coffee, massage chairs and free wifi. This can turn a much dreaded experience into a calm, relaxing part of your day.

Convenience Factor

Your only responsibility is to bring your car in at the manufacturer determined mileage intervals, and the dealership does the rest. The dealership will notify you when it is time to complete a service, and all records of maintenance will be kept in the same system, and will be available on request. Thorough maintenance documentation can help keep your car in warranty, and can come particularly in handy by increasing the resale value when you and your vehicle part ways. The most comprehensive programs even include valet pickups and dropoffs, so you maintenance can be completed without a need for you to even leave your home.

Locking In the Price of Maintenance

With prepaid maintenance plans, all costs are known and paid for in advance. Typically, the cost is rolled in with the total vehicle cost. This means that price increases will not affect your budget. This also means that the final dealership cost of the vehicle is a closer reflection of the total operational costs, and so can be better budgeted for.

Helping Used Cars Last Longer

Used automobiles are the most common mode of transportation for most people. The individual life of any used automobile can be dramatically extended if you give it a little TLC and proper maintenance.

Follow the Maintenance Schedule

The owner’s manuals for used cars will give you a guideline for how often you should get an oil change and when it needs to be serviced. Don’t skip the routine stuff, it’s what keeps most vehicles running smoothly for years.

Replace Parts Before They Become a Problem

If your mechanic tells you the brakes will need replaced soon, go ahead and get them replaced now. Most people who start out thinking, “I’ll do that in the next few months,” forget about it until they’ve burned through their brakes or damage has been done. Preventive care is much less expensive than repairs.

Minimize Short Trips

Every time you start your engine, it takes a toll on gas mileage, your muffler and the engine itself. If you have errands to run, combine them whenever possible. If you have a short commute to work of just a few miles, see if you can carpool with someone or rideshare. A few longer trips are better for your car than a lot of short ones.

Check the Fluids Regularly

Oil, antifreeze, transmission fluid and power steering fluid should be checked and either topped off or changed regularly. The time to add more fluids is not after you’ve burnt up the oil and incurred expensive repairs.

Rotate Tires

Rotating the tires on used cars helps lengthen the life of both the car and the tires. Tire rotation reduces uneven tread wear and improves the vehicle’s ride. In most cases, you should rotate them every 8,000 to 13,000 kilometres or twice a year.

Change the Air Filter

Whether you do it yourself of have it done by a mechanic, changing air filters prolongs the life of used and new cars, improves acceleration and ensures better gas mileage.

Used cars can last for years if you take care of them properly following the above recommendations.